A better way of understanding the ‘conservative-progressive’ divide

Attempts to categorise people are inherently fraught with danger and, frankly, of little real value - if any. People are individuals, with individual thoughts, feelings and emotions that can never be shared completely. Categorisation leads to prejudice, discrimination and tribalism. Worst of all, it leads people to forget that we are all human individuals with … Continue reading A better way of understanding the ‘conservative-progressive’ divide

If positivism is dissatisfying, legal realism is frightening

Legal realism, certainly of the kind that can be traced back to former US Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., represents a bleak picture of law that abandons noble liberal and democratic ideals in favour of a system of rule by a thousand emperors.  Particularly, legal realists' insistence that law can be found in … Continue reading If positivism is dissatisfying, legal realism is frightening

Why legal positivism is a dissatisfying theory of law

Critiquing an entire school of thought is an inherently dangerous undertaking, and this certainly holds true in the case of legal positivism. One of the foremost reasons for this difficulty is that legal positivists' views differ extensively, such that the distance between some classical and contemporary positivists (compare John Austin and Joseph Raz) is arguably … Continue reading Why legal positivism is a dissatisfying theory of law

Cut tax to secure Australia’s future prosperity – my op-ed in The Australian

Maintaining our uncompetitive tax rate risks robbing future generations of Australian workers of the opportunity of the better and higher-paying jobs of the future to pay for services, the benefits of which they might never see.Cut tax to secure Australia’s future prosperity This time last year the United States Congress passed one of the most … Continue reading Cut tax to secure Australia’s future prosperity – my op-ed in The Australian