Why study the humanities over the natural sciences

The science grad asks, “Why does it work?” The engineering grad asks, “How does it work?” The accounting grad asks, “How much will it cost?” The arts grad asks, "Do you want fries with that? Having completed a BA before commencing my JD, I'm no stranger to the all-too-common wisecrack that Arts graduates struggle to … Continue reading Why study the humanities over the natural sciences

Precatory words, Love and the law of equity

In Australia, it is well-established (see eg Paul v Constance) that the creation of a trust requires a sufficiently clear manifestation of intent on the part of the supposed settlor (the 'certainty of intention' requirement). Generally, the requisite intention is said to be evinced by the use of language bearing a sufficiently imperative character. The … Continue reading Precatory words, Love and the law of equity

Why justice matters

Lawyers, judges, politicians, academics and philosophers often appeal to notions of ‘justice’ in public debate and civic discourse. But what the term ‘justice’ actually means is often loosely defined and uncritically understood. Oxford defines justice in terms of ‘just behaviour or treatment’ and ‘the quality of being fair and reasonable’. Cambridge defines justice as ‘the … Continue reading Why justice matters

Travel Diary: America’s Golden Gateway

San Francisco is an incredible city rich in culture and history. I wanted to visit San Francisco in particular for the opportunity to visit San Francisco Chinatown, which represents the largest Chinese ethnic enclave outside of Asia. The original Chinatown itself is a marvel, spanning five zipcodes and some 24 blocks. The streets are lined … Continue reading Travel Diary: America’s Golden Gateway